Multiple Federal Agencies Jointly Warn of Increased and Imminent Cybercrime Threat to U.S. Hospitals and Healthcare Providers

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On October 28, 2020, the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued a Joint Cybersecurity Advisory warning of “an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to U.S. hospitals and healthcare providers.” The agencies collectively warned that “malicious cyber actors are targeting the Healthcare and Public Health (HPH) Sector with Trickbot malware, often leading to ransomware attacks, data theft, and the disruption of healthcare services.”

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Ransomware Payments May Violate Sanctions Laws, U.S. Treasury Department Warns

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Ransomware attacks are on the rise in the wake of COVID-19, but attack victims — and third parties who assist them — could unknowingly be in violation of federal law. A new advisory from the U.S. Department of the Treasury warns that ransom payments to sanctioned individuals or entities may result in significant criminal or civil liability. Companies should closely review the details of this advisory to minimize the risk of violating the U.S. sanctions laws if they are victimized by a ransomware attack.

For the full alert, visit the Faegre Drinker website.

Disruption IV: The New Threat Disruptionware Poses to the American Energy Sector

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Over the past few months, I have written about the threat first identified by the Institute for Critical Infrastructure Technology (ICIT) called disruptionware. We have previously described what disruptionware is, how it works, and outlined some of the defenses that can be used to defend against a multitude of disruptionware attacks. Many may have thought the immediate notifications of the threat posed by this new concept of disruptionware had been adequately made public and sufficiently identified. Unfortunately, disruptionware continues to impact new sectors.

According to ICIT, disruptionware is an evolving category of malware designed to “suspend operations within the victim organization through the compromise of the availability, integrity and confidentiality of the data, systems, and networks belonging to the target.” Recently, ICIT identified a new threat from disruptionware that will likely have a seriously adverse effect on the American energy sector. ICIT goes so far as to refer to disruptionware in the context of an attack on the U.S. energy grid as a “weapon of mass destruction.”

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Disruptionware III: Protect Your Business from a Disruptionware Cyber Attack

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In the first blog in this series, we defined “Disruptionware” and showed how it was growing as a threat to many types of industries throughout the country and the world. The threat was especially noticeable within the healthcare industry and for government institutions. In our second blog, we talked about the different types of tools and attack matrixes that Disruptionware uses to cripple and/or damage unsuspecting businesses and how destructive those attacks can be. This third and final discussion will delineate what businesses can do to defend themselves against a Disruptionware attack and what cyber defenses are at their disposal to alleviate the damages caused by this new and dangerous attack medium.

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DoD’s Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification Is Here: What Your Business Needs to Do to Prepare

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On September 1, 2020, Department of Defense (DoD) contractors will be required to comply with the recently released Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (CMMC) requirements. The CMMC requirements are designed to ensure that suppliers, contractors and subcontractors working with the DoD’s Office of Acquisition and Sustainment have cybersecurity frameworks in place “to assess and enhance the cybersecurity posture of the Defense Industrial Base (DIB).” Through the creation of the CMMC, DoD appears to be enhancing the requirements of NIST 800-171, ISO 27001 and other cybersecurity-related frameworks.

The CMMC model delineates five “maturity” levels, with level 1 being the least secure and level 5 being the most secure. Once the CMMC takes effect, DoD will assign all solicitations an appropriate maturity level that bidders must be able to meet if they wish to bid on the solicitation.

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COVID-19 and Cybersecurity: Combating “Zoombombing” and Securing Your Remote Working Videoconferences

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As COVID-19 has prompted a massive shift by organizations to the implementation and use of remote working solutions for their employees, there has been an unfortunate, but not surprising, corresponding rise in malicious actors seeking to exploit remote working solutions.

Over the past few weeks, the most notable and prevalent “digital hijacking” has occurred on the Zoom teleconferencing application. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an explosion in the number of individuals using the Zoom application. Prior to the pandemic, Zoom averaged approximately 10 million users per day. However, Zoom now estimates that approximately 200 million users per day utilize its videoconferencing application. These users not only include remote workers, but also many school children and teachers who utilize the Zoom application for remote learning.

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